Northern Uganda 2014- Akwoo Spring Protection Project

Photos for this project can be found here.

 

Northern Uganda 2014- Amin Oding Spring Protection Project

Photos of the project can be found here.

 

Northern Uganda 2013- Amin Ogwang Spring Protection Project

Subcounty officials in the area have approached GARD and requested for the protection of a spring called Ogwang. The spring would provide clean water for an estimated 58 households- 446 people. In addition to protecting the Ogwang spring, water/health and sanitation workshops and a biosand filter monitoring program are also scheduled for later this year.

Photos for this project were mostly corrupt unfortunately.  However a couple photos of are available here.

 

Northern Uganda 2012- Amin Oruka Spring Protection Project

Over the last few years a couple of Ugandans were trained on how to budget, design and implement a spring protection project.  This spring is the first 100% completed spring by these trained Ugandans.  They carried out community consultation, hiring, designing and implementation of the project succesfully and now the community of Oruka is benefiting from a protected spring with a flow rate of 20 L per minute.

 

Photos of the project can be found here.

 

Northern Uganda 2011- Alik Spring Protection and Water, Health and Sanitation Training Project

The Project in Alik (2011) went incredibly well, and involved the protection of a spring, a water, heatlh and sanitation education program, a biosand filter monitoring program, and the installment of drip irrigation systems (pilot projects) in and around the village of Alik. The flow rate for the Alik spring is approx. 37 L per minute.
Follow-up visits of the springs protected in Adakingo and Akek revealed that the springs are still running excellent! Biosand filters from our 2008 program were also visited, and are doing well.

Photos of the project can be found here.

 

Northern Uganda 2010- Akek Spring Protection and Water, Health and Sanitation Training Project

The Project in Akek (2010) involved the successful protection of a contaminated spring, a water, health and sanitation education program and a biosand filter monitoring program. The spring protection project consisted of tying 2 springs together and allowing the community to collect water through a GI pipe. A community based organization of 50% women and 50% men continue to educate their community on health and sanitation.

Pictures of the project can be found here.

 

 

Northern Uganda 2008/2009- Adakingo Spring Protection, Biosand filter and Water, Health and Sanitation Training Project

 

The Project in Adakingo (Nov 2008-Jan 2009) was successfully completed through the support of Rotary Canada, Rotary Uganda, Friends and Family. It involved the protection and containment of a spring, a biosand filter project and a water, health and sanitation education program.

The protection and containment of the spring took 2 months to complete with the voluntary support of the community and 7 paid workers. Water was collected from a spring and carried through a pipe to a tank and collection area. The flow rate of this new spring after 2 months without any rain still produces 40 liters of water per minute! With the addition of the tank to store water throughout the night, total accessible water for the village and surrounding areas increased by nearly 4.5 times.

The Biosand Filter and Education programs were successfully put in place at the same time construction of the tank was being completed. A community based organization of 50% women and 50% men continue to implement biosand filters and educate their communities on health and sanitation.

 

Photos of the Spring Protection project can be found here.

Photos of the Biosand filter project can be found here.

 

Southern Uganda 2005- Kitezo Water Catchment and Water, Health and Sanitation Project

The village of Kitezo was the second community to receive a large scale rainwater catchment system. Like Kabumba, their original source of water was runoff from surrounding fields and livestock pastures and had extremely high turbidity levels (suspended clay particles), high fecal coli form counts and numerous parasites.

In 2005, the Kitezo catchment was completed with assistance from African Community Technical Services, the Ugandan Government, the Diocese of Ankola and private Canadian sponsors.

Years later, the system appears to be running well with very little maintenance and has not only been a source of cleaner water for the people of Kitezo, but for many other people in the surrounding areas! The Kitezo catchment holds a little over a million liters of water when it reaches its full capacity.

 

Pictures of the project can be found here.

 

Southern Uganda 2003- Kabumba Water Catchment and Water, Health and Sanitation Project

Villagers in the Kikagati area (includes both Kabumba and Kitezo) of southwestern Uganda like those in many other impoverished rural areas rely primarily on crude earthen dugouts for drinking water and household needs.

The source of this water is runoff from surrounding fields and livestock pastures and has extremely high turbidity levels (suspended clay particles), high fecal coliform counts and numerous parasites. Water from these dugouts is the source of numerous and often fatal diseases as it is difficult, if not impossible to purify with local methods.

In 2003, the Kabumba catchment was completed with assistance from African Community Technical Services, the Ugandan Government, the Diocese of Ankola and private Canadian sponsors.

The system significantly reduces turbidity allowing the water to be purified with local methods and resources- including bio-sand filters. In addition to providing cleaner water year round, the system holds 1.4 million liters of water providing 15 liters of water per person per day for 60 days (their dry season)

 

Pictures of the project can be found here.